HISTORY


"We haven’t divorced ourselves from the past at all, we’ve evolved – from sacramental wine to 93 point Wine Spectator wine.”


- Steve Riboli

1833

1833 Jean- Louis Vignes

French winemaker Jean-Louis Vignes brings the first European vines from his native Bordeaux, plants them in Downtown Los Angeles, and establishes his winery, El Aliso, where Union Station now stands.

1857

1857 Los Angeles and Wine

Demand for wine from Los Angeles increases, creating 47 wineries within 10 years.

1910

1910 Santo Cambianica

Santo Cambianica left his home of Berzo San Fermo, located in the Northern Italian province of Lombardia. After registering at Ellis Island, he arrived in New York and then travels across the country to Downtown Los Angeles.

1917

1917 San Antonio Winery

Santo Cambianica establishes San Antonio Winery on Lamar Street, dedicating it to his Patron Saint Anthony.

1919

1919 Prohibition

United States Congress passes the Volstead Act, which effectively starts Prohibition in America, jolting the wine industry. Luckily for San Antonio Winery, Santo has a strong relationship with the church, and the Archdiocese of Los Angeles grants Santo permission to make wines for sacramental and ceremonial purposes.

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1920-1950

1933

1933 Great Depression

Following the Wall Street Crash of 1929 and the Great Depression, nearly all of the 100 wineries in Los Angeles shut down, while San Antonio Winery continues to flourish, becoming the number one provider of altar wines in Los Angeles.

1933

1933 Prohibition Ends

In 1933, the 21st Amendment to the Constitution is passed and ratified, ending national Prohibition. After the repeal of the 18th Amendment, some states continue Prohibition by maintaining statewide temperance laws. Mississippi, the last dry state in the Union, ends Prohibition in 1966.

1936

1936 From Italy to America

Stefano Riboli’s parents feel there is more opportunity for their son in the United States, and he leaves Italy to apprentice under his Uncle Santo at San Antonio Winery.

1946

1946 Maddalena Satragni

Stefano marries Maddalena Satragni and San Antonio Winery becomes an established institution in California’s wine community. Maddalena’s broach, a treasured gift she received from her mother and brought with her to America, remains a very important symbol of the winery and is the logo for Maddalena wines.

1950

1950 Northern California

Northern California begins to make strides in the winemaking industry, and other wineries begin establishing themselves in the region. Meanwhile, Santo, Stefano, and Maddalena decide to remain with their family in Los Angeles, the place where they have been blessed with good fortune.

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1950-1970

1956

1956 Stefano Riboli

Santo Cambianica passes away, and wishes for Stefano to continue the business for the next generation. Stefano is granted full ownership of San Antonio Winery, and begins to live out the powerful vision he and his wife Maddalena have for their future and their family.

1960

1960 Historic Landmark

Los Angeles’ Cultural Heritage Board designates San Antonio Winery Cultural Monument Number 42.

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1970-Today

1970

1970 Monterey

With the help of their children, Santo and Maddalena purchase vineyard properties in Monterey County.

1980

1980 Napa Valley

The Riboli Family purchases vineyard properties in the prestigious Rutherford appellation of Napa Valley. Here they start relationships and business partnerships with grape growers throughout the state, many of which still exist today.


Backed by tradition, blessed by nature.


-Stefano Riboli


San Antonio Winery remains the oldest and largest producing winery in Los Angeles, just having reached their 100th year of winemaking, making it an essential component of both the city’s cultural and historical landscape. Still sitting on its original Lamar Street location, the winery is the last vestige of the rich winemaking tradition of the greater Los Angeles.

We are blessed to have four generations of family contributing to our success, and in the next hundred years hope to continue our legacy, history, and family within the wine industry and Los Angeles.

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